Sun Acquires MySQL, Oracle Acquires BEA Systems

Although this might sound like a 1st of April joke, it isn’t. Sun has acquired MySQL and Oracle has picked up BEA. Both acquisitions certain to have a big impact on the software development space, particularly on Java and LAMP development.

MySQL press release says – “Sun Microsystems, Inc. today announced it has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire MySQL AB, an open source icon and developer of one of the world’s fastest growing open source databases for approximately $1 billion in total consideration. The acquisition accelerates Sun’s position in enterprise IT to now include the $15 billion database market. Today’s announcement reaffirms Sun’s position as the leading provider of platforms for the Web economy and its role as the largest commercial open source contributor.


“Today’s acquisition reaffirms Sun’s position at the center of the global Web economy. Supporting our overall growth plan, acquiring MySQL amplifies our investments in the technologies demanded by those driving extreme growth and efficiency, from Internet media titans to the world’s largest traditional enterprises,” said Jonathan Schwartz, CEO and president, Sun Microsystems. “MySQL’s employees and culture, along with its near ubiquity across the Web, make it an ideal fit with Sun’s open approach to network innovation. And most importantly, this announcement boosts our investments into the communities at the heart of innovation on the Internet and of enterprises that rely on technology as a competitive weapon.”


Following completion of the proposed transaction, MySQL will be integrated into Sun’s Software, Sales and Service organizations and the company’s CEO, Marten Mickos, will be joining Sun’s senior executive leadership team. In the interim, a joint team with representatives from both companies will develop integration plans that build upon the technical, product and cultural synergies and the best business and product development practices of both companies. MySQL is headquartered in Cupertino, CA and Uppsala, Sweden and has 400 employees in 25 countries.


As part of the transaction, Sun will pay approximately $800 million in cash in exchange for all MySQL stock and assume approximately $200 million in options. The transaction is expected to close in late Q3 or early Q4 of Sun’s fiscal 2008. ”


BEA press release says – “Oracle Corporation and BEA Systems announced today they have entered into a definitive agreement under which Oracle will acquire all outstanding shares of BEA for $19.375 per share in cash. The offer is valued at approximately $8.5 billion, or $7.2 billion net of BEA’s cash on hand of $1.3 billion. “We expect this deal to be accretive to Oracle’s earnings by at least 1-2 cents on a non-GAAP basis in its first full year after closing,” said Oracle President and Chief Financial Officer Safra Catz.


“The addition of BEA products and technology will significantly enhance and extend Oracle’s Fusion middleware software suite,” said Oracle CEO Larry Ellison. “Oracle Fusion middleware has an open “hot-pluggable” architecture that allows customers the option of coupling BEA’s WebLogic Java Server to virtually all the components of the Fusion software suite. That’s just one example of how customers can choose among Oracle and BEA middleware products, knowing that those products will gracefully interoperate and be supported for years to come.”


“Over the past several months our Board of Directors, with the assistance of independent financial and legal advisors, has reviewed various ways to maximize stockholder value, including engaging in discussions with third parties about a possible sale of the company,” said Alfred Chuang, BEA’s Chairman and CEO. “This transaction is the culmination of that diligent and thoughtful process, and we believe it is in the best interests of our shareholders. I am confident our innovative products, talented employees and worldwide customer base will be key contributors to the success of the combined company over the long term. We look forward to working with Oracle toward a successful completion of the transaction.”

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The IndicThreads Content Team posts news about the latest and greatest in software development as well as content from IndicThreads' conferences and events. Track us social media @IndicThreads. Stay tuned!

  • GUEST

    Wonder if Sun will make MySQL truly open and not restrictively open as it currently is.

  • GUEST

    Wonder if Sun will make MySQL truly open and not restrictively open as it currently is.

  • GUEST

    Lots of excitement and change in the web application server market right now — but excitement and change are not what system administrators want. For this group, uncertainty is frightening. With today’s announcement of Oracle acquiring BEA, many companies are going to be faced with migration decisions or decisions on how to effectively support a mixed environment of web application servers. There needs to be a way to easily migrate applications from one web application server to others (even if different flavors – WebSphere, BEA, Oracle, JBoss…). Industry analysts estimate that as much as 40% of all down time is attributable to configuration errors. Configuration chaos may soon present itself as customers try to migrate to or from Oracle OAS and Fusion or to and from BEA. My company, Phurnace, has a great approach to solving this problem. Check out http://www.phurnace.com for more information. – Daniel Nelson, Phurnace co-founder and former system administrator

  • GUEST

    Lots of excitement and change in the web application server market right now — but excitement and change are not what system administrators want. For this group, uncertainty is frightening. With today’s announcement of Oracle acquiring BEA, many companies are going to be faced with migration decisions or decisions on how to effectively support a mixed environment of web application servers. There needs to be a way to easily migrate applications from one web application server to others (even if different flavors – WebSphere, BEA, Oracle, JBoss…). Industry analysts estimate that as much as 40% of all down time is attributable to configuration errors. Configuration chaos may soon present itself as customers try to migrate to or from Oracle OAS and Fusion or to and from BEA. My company, Phurnace, has a great approach to solving this problem. Check out http://www.phurnace.com for more information. – Daniel Nelson, Phurnace co-founder and former system administrator

  • GUEST

    Why has Oracle bought a company that provides the same products that Oracle already has present in its Fusion Middleware stack?

    MySQL acquisition for Sun seems like a much better buy as Sun has hardly any presence in that space.

  • GUEST

    Why has Oracle bought a company that provides the same products that Oracle already has present in its Fusion Middleware stack?

    MySQL acquisition for Sun seems like a much better buy as Sun has hardly any presence in that space.

  • GUEST

    Interestingly, these align exactly with my own preferences.

    I do find Python, C# and Flash more interesting than Java, (the misnomered) AJAX, and Ruby. I feel the latter 3 have been receiving more hype than they deserve lately, whereas the first three are not being given their due.

    Java, ‘AJAX’ and Ruby are important too but I wouldn’t count Python, C# and Flash out just because it sounds quiet on their front. I’m rooting for IronPython to be the next big thing.

  • GUEST

    Interestingly, these align exactly with my own preferences.

    I do find Python, C# and Flash more interesting than Java, (the misnomered) AJAX, and Ruby. I feel the latter 3 have been receiving more hype than they deserve lately, whereas the first three are not being given their due.

    Java, ‘AJAX’ and Ruby are important too but I wouldn’t count Python, C# and Flash out just because it sounds quiet on their front. I’m rooting for IronPython to be the next big thing.