EJBs & Application Servers Are Dead Technologies?

The Spring framework emerged as a lightweight alternative to EJBs and heavy application servers and has been consistently growing in popularity. Spring creator Rod Johnson in a recent keynote has suggested that Java app servers are a dead technology.

You can add the venerable Java application server to the growing list of purported ‘dead technologies,’ suggests Rod Johnson, creator of the Spring Framework.The standard, multipurpose, somewhat heavy-weight Java application server, he says, is giving way to light-weight frameworks….

“The Java application server is effectively dead. The monolithic application server is not in step with the times…”

For the Java app server platform, “the recession was the final blow,” he said. “In a recession people will not pay for features they don’t need…

EJBs and application servers have changed a lot since Spring first came on to the scene. Are the slimmer lighter new EJBs still no good as compared to Spring? Are EJBs and the Java Application server really dead / dying?

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  • Kenneth

    Hard to believe someone will consider current Spring framework is “light-weight”.

    Moreover u don’t for a dime if using Glassfish for application server.

  • Kenneth

    Hard to believe someone will consider current Spring framework is “light-weight”.

    Moreover u don’t for a dime if using Glassfish for application server.

  • It seems like yet another speculative prediction that EJBs would be dead 🙂 That is just a matter of marketing 🙂

  • It seems like yet another speculative prediction that EJBs would be dead 🙂 That is just a matter of marketing 🙂

  • harshad

    Although there’s no denying the popularity of Spring, EJB 3.0 has been fairly well received and adopted. So I don’t see Java application servers dying anytime soon. Also EJB 3.1 is round the corner and might help with the EJB revival.

    • SP

      Spring is no way light. There are lot of features which EJBs provide. And the newer EJB3 provides a lot easier approach. And u can implement EJB using embedded app in tomcat. Further Enterprise apis like JMX and powerful messaging features cannot be done easily with SPRING. EJB will stay till the end. SPRING though popular has not seen the complete technology drift which JAVA ENTERPRISE APIs and EJB has seen.

  • harshad

    Although there’s no denying the popularity of Spring, EJB 3.0 has been fairly well received and adopted. So I don’t see Java application servers dying anytime soon. Also EJB 3.1 is round the corner and might help with the EJB revival.

    • SP

      Spring is no way light. There are lot of features which EJBs provide. And the newer EJB3 provides a lot easier approach. And u can implement EJB using embedded app in tomcat. Further Enterprise apis like JMX and powerful messaging features cannot be done easily with SPRING. EJB will stay till the end. SPRING though popular has not seen the complete technology drift which JAVA ENTERPRISE APIs and EJB has seen.