What’s the future of Java? J2EE/ J2ME / ??

Some suggest that Java is good for another 20-30 years. However one wonders in what form will Java survive. 

While Java has tough competition on the server side from Microsoft, etc., Java on the mobile phone is doing extremely
well. So will J2ME be the primary Java for the next decade or will J2EE
continue to hold good.

Articles like Sun shines on handsets
suggest that "The battle between Java and .Net has shifted from
the courtroom to mobile phones."  The way Java goes is very important
as considering how specialized developers are today, it might happen
that even if you are good at Java and J2EE you are not considered for a
J2ME job.

So if one is to plan a Java centric career for say
the next 5 years, what should one specialize in? Or is trying to be a domain
expert still the best bet? As technology might come and go but the domain
experts still hold jobs and make the developers run around. 🙂

Ref:

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31 thoughts on “What’s the future of Java? J2EE/ J2ME / ??

  • August 27, 2008 at 6:46 am
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    I am a Java Dev Java is great. It’s not dying. Java’s v.6 is better in performance and speed and Look nFeel too. When some one say Java is slow tell one that doesn’t Microsoft ask for upgrading your hardware when it’s new OS is released. Think again!
    By:
    Badar

  • January 26, 2008 at 8:11 am
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    hello friends i am a freshers in java………..
    but i know java is not dying at all………
    just trust the sun’s team…………..
    and all those great minds who are working in java and doing contribution…….
    (and yes its not so slow.)

    dheeraj_oak@rediffmail.com

  • November 26, 2007 at 12:19 am
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    i am a Java developer i don’t think Java is dying all financial sectors are using Java so there is demand for Java and will last till day of judgement.

  • June 2, 2007 at 2:35 pm
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    Developers: ‘Java is too slow!’
    Sun: — Swinging in fetal position in a corner, closing his eyes — ‘It is not slow! It is NOT slow!’

    The Oak tree is already dead.

  • May 27, 2007 at 10:25 pm
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    hi..this is ravi dangaich….
    i would like to mention some of the lines :-

    i)whenever something grows(java),,,there is always many hurdles.

    ii)secondly,,java is nice lang.

    iii)its Mm is good

    iv)it is not slow….friends it gives u the faciltiy for poratbility by bytecode file ,,,n hence it could take some milliseconds more to give output …..so it is not slow …

    v)most imp, how u can guess ab’t its life now ,,who knows future ……this may happen java would be the ultimate lang. among the comp. laguages…

    thanks……….

  • May 26, 2007 at 8:04 pm
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    Looks like sun has made a breakthrough on J2SE 6u1. The Applet load time and Web Start times are virtually non-existent. Check out thinkfree.com or any of the sample applet sites. Java Server Faces on the enterprise side is pretty impressive as well, especially for iseries development. Can’t wait to see javaFX scripting for JSF

    http://www.stevekalvi.blogspot.com

  • May 7, 2007 at 2:00 pm
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    Although I am not a developer, I can say that from a systems/application administration standpoint, Java has two problems:

    1.) It is slow.
    2.) It is difficult to administer in an enterprise environment.

    The fact that the code is portable becomes irrelevant if you don’t have the correct Operating System dependent Virtual Machine installed. I have a MAC/SUN/LINUX/WINDOWS environment with over 10,000 clients. We have a few applications which were written in Java and they need to go on all the clients in the company. Of course each different O.S. has a different V.M. that needs to be installed and updated constantly. One of our main problems is that we have conflicting Java apps on each client. The code was written for a certain version of V.M. per/ O.S. -this becomes a nightmare when I have to rollout an application update because then we must go configure Java Web start to apply 1.4.2_7 to one app and then 1.4.2_13 to another app. etc…
    Imagine doing this 10,000 times per application on multiple O.S.’s. Sure the code is portable, but the VM sure isn’t.

  • April 14, 2007 at 5:23 am
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    After programming in Java for almost 10 years (I started in late 90s), I have switched back to C++. Java is pathetically slow and is a tremendous memory hog. And development is faster in C++. I can usually edit and recompile my entire C++ project before my Java IDE (eclipse) even starts up.

  • April 8, 2007 at 1:48 pm
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    JAVA IS THE FUTURE OF WEB TECHNOLOGY FOR RELIABILIY AND ADVANCED APPLICATION.

    JAVA WILL SURVIVE FOR NEXT 30 YEARS.

  • March 28, 2007 at 11:08 pm
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    java is great and it will survive for another 10 years

  • March 12, 2007 at 11:36 am
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    Java is not slow, that’s a complete falacy. JIT compiles bytecode on the fly, and it works VERY well. I’ve seen 500%-1000% improvements in matrix math operations once the jit runs for a few seconds, keeping java on par with well written C++ code. In theory java can be faster because of memory management issues.

  • February 26, 2007 at 8:09 am
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    Well, Since 1999 Java has been the popular Language for all programmers but as .NET came into the Market, it may easily take some part of Java Web based market so think twice before go for any of these…

  • February 19, 2007 at 8:40 am
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    Yes Java is great and good and ……. but slow.

    The only problem is that Java is slow but of course java is well-known for its OS Independent. where .Net didn’t reach that far yet or at least there is no .Net compiler for other OS than windows.

    So far, I would say java wills survive for another 10-15 years at least before .Net takes over if it does take over at all and if Java keeps on sleeping. 🙂

  • February 18, 2007 at 5:27 am
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    J2EE or J2ME…which has a better future in terms of market share and number of jobs?

  • February 16, 2007 at 4:47 am
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    Well, it’s simple,

    Is ot worth learning J2EE today?
    What is the future of that language.

    As a developper, I see quite many softwares in C#, VB, VC++ etc… but very few in Java.

    However, as I switch to web applications, the cup goes to J2EE which has taken the whole scene by itself now.

    What the future reserves to us, i do not know, but for now, .NET isn’t going to be easily beaten by a Java JBuilder, Forte, etc…

    Yours

  • December 6, 2006 at 4:00 am
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    [IMG]null[/IMG]

    J2ee is very stable. And the developer has the control over application, because it should be built from scratch. If there is a problem, it’s easy to track by an experienced developer.

    In other tools like Microsoft Visual Studio, you get some beyond your control situations, and in that kind of situations or error you will have to wait for vendor’s help.

    Java is the most reliable and comes with lack of marketing tricks and there are almost no unfair trade practices.

  • November 16, 2006 at 7:30 am
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    [B]Java will survive[/B] 🙂 [I]An efficient and organised programing lang for solving great problems..And not for simple problems[/I][U]Dont Make Comparison With other technologies it has its own qualities..[/U]

  • July 29, 2006 at 6:32 am
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    Well I can recall when Microsoft launched their first spreadsheet program, and they designed it to run on multiple platforms, while their competitor bet on their own OS, DOS that it, and it was a big success for him. Point is, not always portability is the best option at the expense of performance and limitation. I am a big fan of Java, and cant see a way back for me to the .Net world, but as I can see, J2EE is the choice for enterprise applications. Companies need and want secured, stable, and portable applications, and they wouldnt mind investing a bit more in the infrastructure. But for mobile, the resources are limited, and so is the user knowledge, so they desperately need efficien out of the box stuff. I have just started digging into the J2ME gaming world, but I browsed the market and found out the majority are Symbian and .Net.

    Perhaps java is unbeatable on the server side, but as installable softwares, you can check the market. They are so much less, and cheap in price.

    Neverthless, I will keep pushing for it from my side, and hope for a prospering future.

  • July 25, 2006 at 2:40 am
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    Can anybody tell abt the scope of j2me ,next decade

  • February 28, 2006 at 6:02 am
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    Java is ultimate,It will persist definately.Technology which provoides
    User/Developer friendly platforms bcome more popular but still the Core pride of java tech remains its own.

    😉

  • November 11, 2005 at 7:02 am
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    java will stay . Its slow but trustable.
    It is not a cheeter like microsoft technologies

  • October 17, 2005 at 7:19 am
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    If Java survived until now, it’s because it’s free. The potential and ideology were noble but lack of a decent IDE for years jeopardized it. And yes, it’s way too slowwww. The good thing is that my transition to C# was easy. I’ll keep an eye on Java however but I doubt I will switch back to it.

    :sigh

  • April 16, 2005 at 11:36 pm
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    JAVA MUST INCREASE ITS SPEED OR IT WILL NOT SURVIVE TOO LONG.
    IN THIS WORLD OF GHZ PROCESSORS WHO WISHES TO ISSUE A JAVAC……..COMMAND
    AND WAIT TO SEE THE RESULT.
    JAMES WAKE UP OR ELSE THE OAK TREE WILL
    DIE.

  • March 27, 2005 at 9:06 pm
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    I only created Java. I am the owner of Java.

    Its future is …

    future=null;

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